Sniffing women’s tears lessens aggressive behaviour in men: Study | Health

0

ANI | | Posted by Krishna Priya Pallavi, Washington Dc

According to new research published in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, tears from women contain molecules that reduce violence in men. The study, directed by Shani Agron of Israel’s Weizmann Institute of Science, discovered that smelling tears reduces brain activity connected to aggression, resulting in less aggressive behaviour.

According to new research published in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, tears from women contain molecules that reduce violence in men. (Pexels)

Male aggression in rodents is known to be blocked when they smell female tears. This is an example of social chemosignaling, a process that is common in animals but less common–or less understood–in humans. To determine whether tears have the same effect on people, the researchers exposed a group of men to either women’s emotional tears or saline while they played a two-person game.

Wrap up the year gone by & gear up for 2024 with HT! Click here

The game was designed to elicit aggressive behaviour against the other player, whom the men were led to believe was cheating. When given the opportunity, the men could get revenge on the other player by causing them to lose money. The men did not know what they were sniffing and could not distinguish between the tears and the saline, which were both odourless.

Revenge-seeking aggressive behaviour during the game dropped more than 40% after the men sniffed women’s emotional tears. When repeated in an MRI scanner, functional imaging showed two aggression-related brain regions–the prefrontal cortex and anterior insula–that became more active when the men were provoked during the game, but did not become as active in the same situations when the men were sniffing the tears.

Individually, the greater the difference in this brain activity, the less often the player took revenge during the game. Finding this link between tears, brain activity, and aggressive behaviour implies that social chemosignaling is a factor in human aggression, not simply animal curiosity.

The authors add, “We found that just like in mice, human tears contain a chemical signal that blocks conspecific male aggression. This goes against the notion that emotional tears are uniquely human.”

This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text. Only the headline has been changed.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *